WHO WE ARE SERVICES RESOURCES




Most recent stories ›
AgroInsight RSS feed
Blog

Tourist development September 10th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Rural communities are starting to welcome local tourism as a way to make money. And more people in the expanding cities of Latin America are now looking for outings they can take close to home.

This year, local officials in Anzaldo, in the provinces of Cochabamba, Bolivia, asked for help bringing tourists to their municipality. Aguiatur, an association of tour guides, offered to help.

In late June, Alberto Buitrón, who heads Aguiatur, and a carload of tour guides, visited Claudio Pérez, the young tourism-culture official for the municipal government of Anzaldo. They went to see local attractions, and people who could benefit from a tour. They also printed an attractive handout explaining what the visitors would see.

In late July, ads ran in the newspaper, promoting the tour, and inviting interested people to deposit 250 Bolivianos ($35) for every two passengers, into a certain bank account. Ana and I live in Cochabamba, 65 kilometers from Anzaldo, and we decided to make the trip, but the banks had already closed on Friday . So, I just went to the Aguiatur office. Alberto was busy preparing for the trip, but he graciously accepted my payment. ‚ÄúAnd with the two of you, the bus is closed,‚ÄĚ Alberto said, with an air of finality.

But by Saturday, more people had asked to go, and so Alberto charted a second bus and phoned the cook who would make our lunch on Sunday. At 8 PM, Saturday night, she agreed to make lunch the next day for 60 people instead of 30. In Bolivia, flexible planning often works just fine.

Early Sunday morning, we tourists met at Barba de Padilla, a small plaza in the old city of Cochabamba, and the tour agents assigned each person a seat on the bus. That would make it easy to see if anyone had strayed. Many of the tourists were retired people, more women than men, and a few grandkids. They were all from Bolivia, but many had never been to Anzaldo.

At each stop, Aguiatur had organized the local people to provide a service or sell food. In the hamlet of Flor de Pukara, we met Claudio, the municipal tourist official, but also Camila, just out of high school, and Zacarías Reyes, a retired school teacher. Camila and don Zacarías were from Flor de Pukara, and they were our local guides to show us the pre-Inka pukara (fortified site). This pukara was a cluster of stone walls on top of a rock crag. Tour guide Marizol Choquetopa, from Aguiatur, cautioned the group not to leave trash and not to remove any of the ancient pot sheds. And no one did, as near as I could tell. Our local guides told us stories about the place: spirits in the form of young ladies are said to appear on one rock outcropping, Torre Qaqa (Cliff Tower), to play music and dance at night.

We walked along the stone banks of the river, the Jatun Mayu. Then Camila’s mother served us phiri, a little dish of steamed cracked wheat, topped with cheese. It was faintly fermented, and fabulous.

In the small town of Anzaldo, we met Marco Delgadillo, a local agronomist and businessman, who has moved back to Anzaldo after his successful career in the city of Cochabamba. His hotel, El Molino del B√ļho (Owl Mill), includes a room for making and tasting chicha, a local alcoholic beverage brewed from maize. There was plenty of room for our large group in the salon, where we had a delicious lunch of lawa, a maize soup with potatoes, roast beef and chicken.

After lunch, our two buses gingerly navigated the narrow streets of the small town of Anzaldo. The town plaza had recently been fitted out with large models of dinosaurs to encourage visitors to come see fossils and dinosaur tracks. Two taxis were parked at the plaza, and the drivers evidently thought that they owned the town square. As the buses inched by, one taxi driver got out and angrily offered to come over and give our bus driver a beating. The passengers yelled back, urging the taxi driver to be reasonable, and he quieted down.

Our sense of adventure heightened by that buffoonish threat of violence, we drove out to the village of Tijraska. Local leaders clearly wanted to receive visitors. The community had prepared for our visit by putting up little signs indicating how to get to there. One of the leaders, don Mario, welcomed us in Quechua, the local language. Then he paused and asked if the tourists could understand Quechua.

Several people said yes, which delighted don Mario.

We strolled down to the banks of the muddy reservoir, in a narrow canyon. One young man, Ramiro, had bought a new wooden boat, with which he paddled small groups around an island in the reservoir.

For the grand finale, we stopped at the home of Ariel Angulo, a respected Bolivian musician, song writer and maker of musical instruments. Don Ariel played for us, and showed us the shop where he carves his wooden charangos, small stringed instruments. He explained that the charango was copied from a colonial Spanish instrument, the timple. After living in the city of Cochabamba for years, don Ariel has moved back home, to Anzaldo. The best charangos used to be made in Anzaldo, before the instrument makers moved to Cochabamba. Don Ariel hopes to teach young people to make charangos, and bring the craft back to Anzaldo.

This was the first ever package tour to come to Anzaldo. Local tourism from the emerging big cities of tropical countries can be a source of income for rural people, while teaching city people something about the countryside. Some people who left the small towns are retiring back in the countryside, and can help provide services to visitors and even bring traditional crafts back. It is easier for Bolivian tour guides to work with local tourists than foreign ones. For example, the local people speak the national languages. The local tour guides know how to deal with customers who sign up late. There may be risks of over-visitation, but for now, municipal governments are willing to explore tourism as development. And it can be done locally, with no foreign investment or international visitors.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to David Garviz√ļ, Irassema Guzm√°n, Marizol Choquetopa and Alberto Buitr√≥n of Aguiatur, for a safe and educational trip to Anzaldo. Alberto Buitr√≥n, Ana Gonz√°les and Paul Van Mele read and commented on an earlier version of this story.

A video from Anzaldo

Here is a video about producing healthy lupins, a nutritious. local food crop, filmed in Anzaldo in 2017. Growing lupin without disease

TURISMO PARA EL DESARROLLO

Jeff Bentley, 10 de septiembre del 2023

Las comunidades rurales empiezan a fomentar el turismo local para generar ingresos. Y más gente en las crecientes ciudades de Latinoamérica empieza a buscar destinos cerca de la casa.

Este a√Īo, algunos oficiales en Anzaldo, en las provincias de Cochabamba, Bolivia, pidieron ayuda para traer turistas a su municipio. Aguiatur, una asociaci√≥n de gu√≠as tur√≠sticos, ofreci√≥ su ayuda.

Fines de junio, Alberto Buitrón, el director de Aguiatur, y varios guías, visitaron a Claudio Pérez, el joven Responsable de Turismo-Cultura del municipio de Anzaldo. Visitaron a varios atractivos, y a vecinos que podrían aprovechar del tour. Además, imprimieron un lindo folleto explicando qué es que los visitantes verían.

Fines de julio, salieron anuncios en el peri√≥dico, promoviendo el tour, e invitando a los interesados a depositar 250 Bs. ($35) para cada par de pasajeros, en una cuenta bancaria. Ana y yo vivimos Cochabamba, a 65 kil√≥metros de Anzaldo, y reci√©n decidimos viajar despu√©s del cierre de los bancos el viernes. Por eso, fui no m√°s a las oficinas de Aguiatur. Alberto estaba en plenos preparativos para el tour, pero amablemente me atendi√≥. ‚ÄúY con ustedes dos, el bus est√° cerrado,‚ÄĚ dijo Alberto, con el aire de la finalidad.

Sin embargo, para el sábado más personas pidieron cupos, así que Alberto contrató un segundo bus, y llamó a la cocinera que haría nuestro almuerzo el domingo. A las 8 PM, el sábado, ella quedó en hacer almuerzo para el día siguiente para 60 personas en vez de 30. En Bolivia, la planificación flexible suele funcionar bastante bien.

A primera hora el domingo, los turistas nos reunimos en la peque√Īa plaza de Barba de Padilla, en el casco viejo de Cochabamba, y los gu√≠as tur√≠sticos asignaron a cada persona un asiento en el bus. As√≠ podr√≠an llevar un buen control y no perder a nadie. Muchos de los turistas eran jubilados, m√°s mujeres que hombres, con algunos nietitos. Todos eran de Bolivia, pero muchos no conoc√≠an a Anzaldo.

En cada escala, Aguiatur hab√≠a organizado a la gente local para dar un servicio o vender comida. En el caser√≠o de Flor de Pukara, conocimos a Claudio, el oficial de turismo municipal, pero tambi√©n a Camila, reci√©n egresada del colegio, y Zacar√≠as Reyes, un profesor jubilado. Camila y don Zacar√≠as eran de Flor de Pukara, y como gu√≠as locales nos mostraron la Pukara preincaica. La pukara era una colecci√≥n de muros de piedra encima de un pe√Īasco. Nuestra gu√≠a Marizol Choquetopa, de Aguiatur, advirti√≥ al grupo no botar basura y no llevar los tiestos antiguos. Y que yo sepa, nadie lo hizo. Nuestros gu√≠as locales nos contaron cuentos del lugar: esp√≠ritus en forma de se√Īoritas que aparecen sobre una un pe√Īasco, Torre Qaqa, para tocar m√ļsica y bailar de noche.

Caminamos sobre las orillas pedregosas del río Jatun Mayu. Luego la mamá de Camila nos sirvió un platillo de phiri, trigo quebrado al vapor con un poco de queso encima. Ligeramente fermentada, era fabulosa.

En el pueblo de Anzaldo, conocimos a Marco Delgadillo, agr√≥nomo local y empresario, que hab√≠a retornado a Anzaldo despu√©s de su exitosa carrera en la ciudad de Cochabamba. Su hotel, El Molino del B√ļho, incluye un cuarto para hacer y catear chicha de ma√≠z. Hab√≠a amplio campo para nuestro grupo en el sal√≥n principal, donde disfrutamos de un almuerzo delicioso de lawa, una sopa de ma√≠z con papas, carne asada y pollo.

Despu√©s del almuerzo, nuestros dos buses lentamente navegaron las estrechas calles del pueblo de Anzaldo. En la plaza se hab√≠an instalado modelos grandes de dinosaurios para animar a los turistas a visitar para ver a los f√≥siles y huellas de dinosaurios. Dos taxis estacionados se hab√≠an adue√Īado de la plaza. Los buses pasaban cent√≠metro por cent√≠metro, cuando un taxista sali√≥ y, perdiendo los cables, ofreci√≥ dar una paliza a nuestro conductor. Los pasajeros gritamos en su defensa, sugiriendo calma, y el taxista se call√≥.

Después del show del taxista payaso, tuvimos más ganas todavía para la aventura, mientras nos dirigimos a la comunidad de Tijraska. Los dirigentes claramente querían recibir visitas. La comunidad había preparado para nuestra visita, colocando letreros indicando el camino. Uno de los dirigentes, don Mario, nos dio la bienvenida en quechua, el idioma local. Luego pausó y dijo que tal vez no todos hablábamos el quechua.

De una vez, varios dijeron que sí, lo cual encantó a don Mario.

Caminamos a las orillas de un reservorio con agua color de tierra, en un ca√Ī√≥n angosto. Un joven, Ramiro, hab√≠a comprado una nueva lancha. Subimos en peque√Īos grupos y a remo nos mostr√≥ una isla en el reservorio.

Para cerrar con broche de oro, visitamos la casa de Ariel Angulo, un respetado m√ļsico boliviano. Tambi√©n es cantautor y hace finos instrumentos musicales. Don Ariel toc√≥ un par de canciones para nosotros, y nos mostr√≥ su taller de charangos de madera. Explic√≥ que el charango se copi√≥ durante la colonia de un instrumento espa√Īol, el timple. Despu√©s de vivir durante a√Īos en la ciudad de Cochabamba, don Ariel ha vuelto a su tierra natal, a Anzaldo. En anta√Īo los mejores charangos se hac√≠an en Anzaldo, antes de que los fabricantes se fueron a Cochabamba. Don Ariel espera ense√Īar a los j√≥venes a hacer charangos, y devolver esta arte a Anzaldo.

Nuestra gira a Anzaldo era el primero en la historia. El turismo local, partiendo de las pujantes ciudades de los pa√≠ses tropicales, puede ser una fuente de ingreso para la gente rural, mientras los citadinos aprendemos algo del campo. Algunas personas que abandonaron las provincias est√°n volviendo, y pueden ayudar a dar servicios a los visitantes, y hasta dar vida a las artes tradicionales. Es m√°s f√°cil para gu√≠as bolivianos trabajar con turistas locales que con extranjeros. Por ejemplo, los turistas locales hablan los idiomas nacionales. Los gu√≠as locales saben lidiar con clientes que se apuntan a √ļltima hora. S√≠ se corre el riesgo de una sobre visitaci√≥n, pero para ahora, los gobiernos municipales est√°n explorando al turismo local como una contribuci√≥n del desarrollo. Y se puede hacer con recursos locales, sin inversi√≥n extranjera y sin turistas internacionales.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a David Garviz√ļ, Irassema Guzm√°n, Marizol Choquetopa y Alberto Buitr√≥n de Aguiatur, por un viaje seguro y educativo a Anzaldo. Alberto Buitr√≥n, Ana Gonz√°les y Paul Van Mele leyeron e hicieron comentarios sobre una versi√≥n previa de este relato.

Un video de Anzaldo

Aquí está un video que muestra cómo producir tarwi (lupino) sano, un nutritivo alimento local, filmado en Anzaldo en el 2017. Producir tarwi sin enfermedad.

 

Neighborhood trees August 20th, 2023 by

Vea la versi√≥n en espa√Īol a continuaci√≥n

Trees make a city feel like a decent place to live. That often means planting the trees, which help to cool cities, sequester carbon and provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife. But large-scale tree planting in a city can be difficult.

Cochabamba, Bolivia is one of many fast-growing, tropical cities. In the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s people may live in a city like this. Cochabamba is nestled in a large Andean valley, but in the last twenty years, the city has also spread into the nearby Sacaba Valley, which was formerly devoted to growing rainfed wheat. As late as the 1990s, the small town of Sacaba was just a few blocks wide. Now 220,000 people live in that valley, which has become part of metropolitan Cochabamba. The wheat fields of Sacaba have been replaced by a maze of asphalt streets, and neat homes of brick, cement and tile.

I was in Sacaba recently with my wife Ana, who introduced me to some people who are planting trees along the banks of a dry wash, the Waych’a Mayu. It was once a seasonal stream, but it is now dry all year. It has been blocked upstream by people who have built streets and causeways over it.

For the past 18 months, an architect, Alain Vimercati, and an agroforester, Ariel Ayma, have been working with local neighborhoods in Sacaba to organize tree planting. That included many meetings with the leaders and the residents of 12 grassroots neighborhood associations (OTBs‚ÄĒorganizaciones territoriales de base) to plan the project.

They decided to plant trees along the Waych’a Mayu, which still had some remnant forests of dryland trees, like molle and jarka. The local people had seen some of the long, shady parks in the older parts of Cochabamba. They were excited to have a green belt, five kilometers long, running through their own neighborhoods. Alain and Ariel, with the NGO Pro Hábitat, produced 2,400 tree seedlings in partnership with the local, public forestry school (ESFOR-UMSS). The local people dug the holes, planted the trees, and built small protective fences around them.

The trees were planted in January. In July, Ana and I went with about 20 people from some of the OTBs to see how the seedlings were doing. When we reached the line of trees, Ariel, the agro-forester, pointed out that the trees had more than doubled in size in just six months. Eighty percent of them had survived. But now they had to be maintained. It has been a dry year, and it hasn‚Äôt rained for five months. The trees were starting to wilt. Even so, Ariel encouraged the people by saying ‚Äúmaintenance is more important than water.‚ÄĚ He meant that while the trees did need some water, they also needed to be protected. It is important to reassure people that they won‚Äôt have to spend money on water. Many people in Sacaba have to buy their water. As we met, cistern trucks drove up and down the streets, offering 200 liters of water for 7 Bolivianos ($1).

The seedlings include a few hardy lemons, but most of the other species are native, dryland trees: guava, broadleaf hopbush (chacatea), jacaranda, tara, tipa, and ceibo.

Ariel used a pick and shovel to show the group how to clear a half-moon around the trees, to catch rain water. He has a Ph.D. in agroforestry, but he seems to love the physical work.

Ariel cut the weeds from around the first tree, and placed them around the base of the trunk, to shade the soil. The representatives from the OTBs, including a retired man, and a woman carrying a baby, quickly agreed to meet a week later, and to bring more people from each neighborhood, to help take care of the trees.

Ana and I went back the following Saturday. A Bolivian bank had paid for a tanker truck of water (16,000 liters, worth about $44). I was surprised how many people turned out, as many as fifteen or twenty at some OTBs. They used their own picks and shovels to quickly clean out the hole around each tree. Then they waited for the tanker truck to fill their barrels so the people from the neighborhoods could give each thirsty tree a bucketful of water. Ariel explained that a bit of water the first year will help the trees recover from the shock of being transplanted, then they should normally survive on rain water. The neighbors did feel a sense of ownership. Some of them told us that they occasionally poured a bucket of recycled water on the trees near their homes.

Ariel is also a professor of forestry, and some of his students had come to help advise the local people. But the residents did most of the work, and in most OTBs the trees were soon weeded and ready to be watered.

The people have settled in Sacaba from all over highland Bolivia, from Oruro, La Paz, Potosí and rural parts of Cochabamba. They have organized themselves into OTBs, which made it possible for Alain and Ariel to work with the neighborhood associations to plan the greenbelt and plant the trees. The cell phone also helps. A few years ago, people had to be invited by a local leader going door-to-door. At those few neighborhoods where no one showed up, Alain phoned the leader of the OTB, who rang up the neighbors. Sometimes within half an hour of making the first phone call, people were digging out the holes around each tree.

In the rapidly-growing cities of the developing world, many of the new residents are from farming communities, and they have rural skills, useful when planting trees. Their new neighborhoods will be much nicer places to live if they have trees. Hopefully, as this case shows, the tree species will be well suited to the local environment, and the local people will be empowered with a sense of ownership of their green areas.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Alain Vimercati and Ariel Ayma of Pro H√°bitat, and to all the people who are planting and caring for the trees.

Scientific names

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (previously Acacia visco)

Guava Psidium guajava

Broadleaf hopbush (common name in Bolivia: chacatea), Dodonaea viscosa

Jacaranda Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-galli

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The cherry on the pie

Experiments with trees

The right way to distribute trees

Videos on caring for trees

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Flowering plants attract the insects that help us

Demi lunes

Managed regeneration

ARBOLES DEL BARRIO

Jeff Bentley, 20 de agosto del 2023

Los árboles hacen que una ciudad sea más amena. A menudo hay que plantar los árboles, que ayudan a refrescar las ciudades, capturar carbono y crear un hábitat para la vida silvestre, como las aves. Pero plantar árboles a gran escala en una ciudad puede ser difícil.

Cochabamba, Bolivia es una de las muchas ciudades tropicales de r√°pido crecimiento. En un futuro pr√≥ximo, la mayor parte de la poblaci√≥n mundial podr√≠a vivir en una ciudad como √©sta. Cochabamba est√° anidada en un gran valle andino, pero en los √ļltimos veinte a√Īos la ciudad se ha extendido tambi√©n al cercano valle de Sacaba, antes sembrado en trigo de secano. En la d√©cada de los 1990, la peque√Īa ciudad de Sacaba s√≥lo ten√≠a unas manzanas de ancho. Ahora viven 220.000 personas en ese valle, que ha pasado a formar parte de la zona metropolitana de Cochabamba. Los trigales de Sacaba han sido sustituidos por un laberinto de calles asfaltadas y bonitas casas de ladrillo, cemento y teja.

Hace poco estuve en Sacaba con mi esposa Ana, que me present√≥ a unas personas que est√°n plantando √°rboles a orillas de un arroyo seco, el Waych’a Mayu. Antes era un arroyo estacional, pero ahora est√° seco todo el a√Īo. Ha sido bloqueado r√≠o arriba por personas que han construido calles y terraplenes sobre el curso del agua.

Durante los √ļltimos 18 meses, un arquitecto, Alain Vimercati, y un doctor en ciencias silvoagropecuarias, Ariel Ayma, han trabajado con los vecinos de Sacaba para organizar la plantaci√≥n de √°rboles. Eso incluy√≥ varias reuniones con los l√≠deres y los residentes de 12 organizaciones territoriales de base (OTBs) para planificar el proyecto.

Decidieron plantar √°rboles a lo largo del Waych’a Mayu, que a√ļn conservaba algunos bosques remanentes de √°rboles de secano, como molle y jarka. La poblaci√≥n local hab√≠a visto algunos de los largos parques arboleados de las zonas m√°s antiguas de Cochabamba. Estaban entusiasmados con la idea de tener un cintur√≥n verde de cinco kil√≥metros que atravesara sus barrios de ellos. Alain y Ariel, con la ONG Pro H√°bitat, produjeron 2.400 plantines de √°rboles en coordinaci√≥n con la Escuela de Ciencias Forestales (ESFOR-UMSS). Los vecinos cavaron los hoyos, plantaron los √°rboles y construyeron peque√Īos cercos protectores alrededor de cada uno.

Los √°rboles se plantaron en enero. En julio, Ana y yo fuimos con unas 20 personas de algunas de las OTBs a ver c√≥mo iban los plantines. Cuando llegamos a la l√≠nea de √°rboles, Ariel nos dijo que los √°rboles hab√≠an duplicado su tama√Īo en s√≥lo seis meses. El 80% hab√≠a sobrevivido. Pero ahora hab√≠a que mantenerlos. Ha sido un a√Īo seco y no ha llovido en cinco meses. Los √°rboles empezaban a marchitarse. Aun as√≠, Ariel anim√≥ a la gente diciendo que “el mantenimiento es m√°s importante que el agua”. Quer√≠a decir que, aunque los √°rboles necesitaban agua, tambi√©n hab√≠a que protegerlos. Es importante asegurar a la gente que no tendr√° que gastar dinero en agua. Muchos habitantes de Sacaba tienen que comprar el agua. Mientras nos reun√≠amos, camiones cisterna recorr√≠an las calles ofreciendo 200 litros de agua por 7 bolivianos (1 d√≥lar).

Entre los plantines hay algunos limones resistentes, pero la mayoría de las demás especies son árboles nativos de secano: guayaba, chacatea, jacarandá, tara, tipa y ceibo.

Ariel usó una picota y una pala para mostrar al grupo cómo limpiar una media luna alrededor de los árboles, para recoger el agua de lluvia. Tiene un doctorado, pero parece que le encanta el trabajo físico.

Ariel cortó el monte de alrededor del primer árbol y colocó la challa alrededor de la base del tronco, para dar sombra al suelo. Los representantes de las OTB, entre ellos un jubilado y una mujer con un bebé a cuestas, acordaron rápidamente reunirse una semana más tarde y traer a más gente de cada barrio para ayudar a cuidar los árboles.

Ana y yo volvimos el s√°bado siguiente. Un banco boliviano hab√≠a pagado un cami√≥n cisterna de agua (16.000 litros, por valor de unos 300 Bolivianos‚ÄĒ44 d√≥lares). Me sorprendi√≥ la cantidad de gente que acudi√≥, hasta quince o veinte en algunas OTBs. Usaron sus propias palas y picotas para limpiar r√°pidamente el agujero alrededor de cada √°rbol. Luego esperaron a que el cami√≥n cisterna llenara sus barriles para que los vecinos pudieran dar a cada √°rbol sediento un cubo lleno de agua. Ariel explic√≥ que un poco de agua el primer a√Īo ayudar√≠a a los √°rboles a recuperarse del shock de ser trasplantados, y que despu√©s deber√≠an sobrevivir normalmente con el agua de lluvia. Los vecinos estaban empezando a cuidar a los arbolitos. Algunos nos contaron que de vez en cuando echaban un cubo de agua reciclada en los √°rboles cercanos a sus casas.

Ariel es tambi√©n profesor universitario, y algunos de sus alumnos hab√≠an venido a ayudar a asesorar a los lugare√Īos. Pero los residentes hicieron la mayor parte del trabajo, y en la mayor√≠a de las OTBs los √°rboles pronto estaban limpiados y listos para ser regados.

La gente se ha asentado en Sacaba de toda la parte alta de Bolivia, de Oruro, La Paz, Potos√≠ y zonas rurales de Cochabamba. Se han organizado en OTBs, lo que ha permitido a Alain y Ariel trabajar con ellos para planificar el cintur√≥n verde y plantar los √°rboles. El celular tambi√©n ayuda. Hace unos a√Īos, la gente ten√≠a que ser invitada por un dirigente local que iba puerta en puerta. En los pocos barrios donde no aparec√≠a nadie, Alain telefoneaba al dirigente de la OTB, que llamaba a los vecinos. A veces, media hora despu√©s de la primera llamada, la gente ya estaba cavando los agujeros alrededor de cada √°rbol.

En las ciudades de r√°pido crecimiento del mundo en v√≠as del desarrollo, muchos de los nuevos residentes vienen de comunidades agr√≠colas y tienen conocimientos rurales, √ļtiles a la hora de plantar √°rboles. Sus nuevos barrios ser√°n lugares mucho m√°s agradables para vivir si tienen √°rboles. Ojal√° que, como demuestra este caso, las especies arb√≥reas se adapten bien al ambiente local y la gente local sea empoderada para adue√Īarse de sus √°reas verdes.

Agradecimientos

Gracias a Alain Vimercati y Ariel Ayma de Pro H√°bitat, y a todos los vecinos que plantan y cuidan sus √°rboles.

Nombres científicos

Molle Schinus molle

Jarka Parasenegalia visco (antes Acacia visco)

Guayaba Psidium guajava

Chacatea Dodonaea viscosa

Jacarand√° Jacaranda mimosifolia

Tara Caesalpinia spinosa

Tipa Tipuana tipu

Ceibo Erythrina crista-gall

También en el blog de Agro-Insight

The cherry on the pie

Experimentos con √°rboles

La manera correcta de distribuir los √°rboles

Videos sobre el cuidado de los √°rboles

Barreras vivas para proteger el suelo

Las plantas con flores atraen a los insectos que nos ayudan

Medias lunas

Regeneración manejada

 

The cherry on the pie July 2nd, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Conserving traditional varieties for future generations is worthwhile, yet challenging, especially when it comes to fruit trees, as my wife Marcella and I learned on a recent visit to the castle of Alden Biezen, in Belgium, where for the 20th year a special ‚ÄúCherry‚ÄĚ event was organized.

On the inner court of the 16th-century castle, in the municipality of Bilzen in the province of Limburg, Belgium, various local organizations had installed information booths, on bee-keeping, the juice mobile and traditional fruit varieties.

Belgium wouldn’t be Belgium if there weren’t also stands where you could taste cherry beer and local delicacies, such as thick pancakes stuffed with cherries. Information boards along the pathway offered interesting stories, testimonials and in-depth knowledge of late and retired cherry farmers.

As the temperature that Sunday rose to 31 degrees Celsius, we were happy that the organisers had installed a temporary exhibition in one of the castle halls. It was amazing to see so many cherry varieties on display, from pale yellow to deep red and almost black. We also learned that the cherry stems, which we normally discard on the compost pile, have anti-inflammatory and other medicinal properties, when dried and used in tea.

The real highlight was the guided tour by Paul Van Laer, coordinator at the non-profit association the National Orchard Foundation (Nationale Boomgaardenstichting). On the sloping grounds of the castle, the association had planted several hectares of traditional varieties of cherry trees to conserve the genetic diversity as well as the knowledge to grow them. Already six years ago, we were so inspired by the work of the Foundation that we bought about 30 young trees of traditional apple, pear, plum and cherry varieties from them to plant at home in our pasture.

Standing on a typical ladder used to pick cherries, Paul passionately speaks to the visitors. With his life-long experience he can tell stories about every single variety. Encouraging citizens to plant traditional fruit tree varieties helps to ensure that the genetic diversity is conserved in as many different locations as possible. And it quickly dawns on us how important this strategy is.

Paul points to the field where tall-stemmed cherry trees were planted about 20 years ago. We are all shocked to see that most of the trees had died. ‚ÄúWhen you plant tall-stemmed varieties, you can normally harvest cherries for the next 70 years,‚ÄĚ Paul explains, ‚Äúbut with the disturbed climate that we are witnessing the past decade, many trees cannot survive. We used to have more than 80 cherry varieties, but we are really struggling to keep them alive.‚ÄĚ Heat stress, droughts, floods and new pests that have arrived with the changing climate (and without their natural enemies), such as the Asian fruit fly (Drosophilla suzukii), have made it so that current commercial farmers only grow cherries under highly controlled environments.

One of the visitors is curious to know whether, given the many challenges, it is still worthwhile to plant a cherry tree in your garden. ‚ÄúWhen you live away from commercial farm or orchards where lots of cherry trees are grown, there is less presence of the fruit fly. Also, if you only have a few fruit trees around your house, you can easily water them, if need be,‚ÄĚ says Paul. For the National Orchard Foundation, having people grow cherry trees back home may become increasingly important in the long run.

As cherry trees are affected by the disturbed climate, gardeners and smallholders who have space could plant a single tree. Not only it would contribute to conserve the genetic diversity, it will also give you some delicious cherries to put on your pie.

Related blogs

European deserts, coming soon

The juice mobile

Training trees

Ignoring signs from nature

When the bees hit a brick wall

A farm in the city

 

De kers op de taart

Het behoud van traditionele vari√ęteiten voor toekomstige generaties is de moeite waard, maar ook een uitdaging, vooral als het gaat om fruitbomen, zoals mijn vrouw Marcella en ik leerden tijdens een recent bezoek aan het kasteel van Alden Biezen, in Belgi√ę, waar voor het 20e jaar een speciaal “Kersen” evenement werd georganiseerd.

Op het binnenplein van het 16e-eeuwse kasteel, in de gemeente Bilzen in de provincie Limburg, Belgi√ę, hadden verschillende lokale organisaties informatiestands ingericht, waaronder √©√©n over bijenteelt, de sapmobiel en een stand over traditionele fruitsoorten.

Belgi√ę zou Belgi√ę niet zijn als er niet ook stands waren waar je kersenbier kon proeven en lokale lekkernijen, zoals dikke pannenkoeken gevuld met kersen. Informatieborden langs het pad boden interessante verhalen, getuigenissen en diepgaande kennis van overleden en gepensioneerde kersenboeren.

Omdat de temperatuur die zondag opliep tot 31 graden Celsius, waren we blij dat de organisatoren een tijdelijke tentoonstelling hadden ingericht in een van de kasteelzalen. Het was verbazingwekkend om zoveel kersensoorten te zien, van lichtgeel tot dieprood en bijna zwart. We leerden ook dat de kersenstengels, die we normaal gesproken op de composthoop gooien, ontstekingsremmende en andere geneeskrachtige eigenschappen hebben als ze gedroogd worden en in thee worden gebruikt.

Het echte hoogtepunt was de rondleiding door Paul Van Laer, co√∂rdinator van de Nationale Boomgaardenstichting. Op het glooiende terrein van het kasteel had de vereniging verschillende hectaren met traditionele vari√ęteiten van kersenbomen geplant om de genetische diversiteit en de kennis om ze te kweken te behouden. Al zes jaar geleden waren we zo ge√Įnspireerd door het werk van de Nationale Boomgaardenstichting dat we ongeveer 30 jonge bomen van traditionele appel-, peren-, pruimen- en kersenrassen van hen kochten om thuis in ons weiland te planten.

Staande op een typische ladder die gebruikt wordt om kersen te plukken, staat Paul de bezoekers hartstochtelijk te woord. Met zijn levenslange ervaring kan hij verhalen vertellen over elke vari√ęteit. Burgers aanmoedigen om traditionele fruitboomvari√ęteiten te planten helpt om de genetische diversiteit op zoveel mogelijk verschillende locaties te behouden. En het wordt ons al snel duidelijk hoe belangrijk deze strategie is.

Paul wijst naar het veld waar 20 jaar geleden hoogstam kersenbomen zijn geplant. We zijn allemaal geschokt als we zien dat de meeste bomen zijn doodgegaan. “Als je hoogstammige vari√ęteiten plant, kun je normaal gesproken de komende 70 jaar kersen oogsten,” legt Paul uit, “maar met het verstoorde klimaat van de afgelopen tien jaar kunnen veel bomen niet overleven. Vroeger hadden we meer dan 80 kersenvari√ęteiten, maar we hebben echt moeite om ze in leven te houden.” Hittestress, droogte, overstromingen en nieuwe plagen die met het veranderende klimaat zijn gekomen (en zonder hun natuurlijke vijanden), zoals de Aziatische fruitvlieg (Drosophilla suzukii), hebben ervoor gezorgd dat de huidige commerci√ęle boeren alleen kersen telen in zeer gecontroleerde omgevingen.

Een van de bezoekers is benieuwd of het, gezien de vele uitdagingen, nog steeds de moeite waard is om een kersenboom in je tuin te planten. “Als je niet in de buurt woont van commerci√ęle boerderijen of boomgaarden waar veel kersenbomen worden gekweekt, is er minder aanwezigheid van de fruitvlieg. Als je maar een paar fruitbomen rond je huis hebt, kun je ze ook gemakkelijk water geven als dat nodig is,” zegt Paul. Voor de Nationale Boomgaarden Stichting kan het op de lange termijn steeds belangrijker worden om mensen thuis kersenbomen te laten kweken.

Omdat kersenbomen worden be√Įnvloed door het verstoorde klimaat, zouden tuiniers en kleine boeren die ruimte hebben een enkele boom kunnen planten. Het zou niet alleen bijdragen aan het behoud van de genetische diversiteit, maar het zal je ook heerlijke kersen opleveren voor op je taart.

Seeing the life in the soil June 25th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Earlier, Jeff and I have written various blogs about the importance of soil organic matter and soil life to support  thriving, sustainable food production. Soils that have many living organisms hold more carbon and nutrients and can better absorb and retain rainwater, all of which are crucial in these times of a disturbed climate.

But measuring life in soils can be a time-consuming activity depending on what one wants to measure. While bacteria and fungi cannot be seen by the naked eye, ants, grubs and earth worms can.

In one of the training videos that we filmed in Bolivia last February, Eliseo Mamani from the PROINPA Foundation, a science and technology organization, shows us meticulously how you can measure the visible soil organisms with farmers. Using a standardised method to measure soil life is important if you want to evaluate how certain farming practices have an effect on the life of your soil.

One early morning, we pick up Ana Mamani and Rubén Chipana from their homes to take us to a field on the altiplano that has been cultivated for various years and that has not received any organic fertilizer. The farmers of Chiarumani, Patacamaya, about 100 kilometres south of La Paz, have learned through collaborative research that there are more living things in some parts of the field, and fewer in other parts, so they take samples from 3 parts of the field.

With a spade they remove a block of soil 20 centimetres wide, 20 centimetres long and 20 centimetres deep. They carefully put all this soil in a white bag and close it tightly, so that the living things do not escape, because the earthworms and other living things move quickly.

We then drive to another place, where they collect 3 more samples from a field that has received organic fertilizer and where organic vegetables are grown. All samples are put in blue bags, all nicely labelled.

Under the shade of a tree, some more farmers have gathered to start counting the living organisms. One handful of soil at a time, they empty each bag on a plastic tray. As they come across a living creature, they carefully pick it out and report it to Eliseo who takes notes: how many earthworms, how many ants, how many termites, how many beetles, how many spiders and how many grubs.

After an hour, the results are added up and samples compared: there are only many earthworms in the soil from the field that received organic fertilizer. The farmers discuss the findings in group and conclude: If your soil has few living things, you can bring your soil to life by adding animal manure or compost, by leaving crop residues in the field, and not burning them. You can also improve soil life by ploughing less, as ploughing disturbs bacteria, fungi, and animals that add fertility to the soil.

After returning back home from our trip to Bolivia, I am still reflecting on the many things we have learned from farmers and the organisations who do basic, yet relevant research with them, when Marcella points to the fields in front of our office. In March, at the onset of spring, moles are most active. It is striking: the field to the left that hasn’t been ploughed or fertilized for several years has many mole hills. The field on the right is intensively managed and does not have a single mole hill. Ploughing reduces organic matter, which is feed for earthworms. Herbicides and pesticides kill soil life, including earthworms. Also, liquid manure, which is used abundantly across Flanders and the Netherlands, can kill earthworms, especially when cows have received antibiotics and other drugs. Liquid manure may also contain heavy metals used for animal feed, such as zinc and copper.

Earthworms can be counted and used as soil health bioindicators. When done in collaborative research with farmer groups this helps farmers understand how certain farming practices affects the health of their soil and the long-term sustainability of their farm. However, if you don’t have time to go out with a spade to take soil samples, even above ground indicators such as mole hills can offer a quick alternative.

Acknowledgements

The visit to Bolivia to film various farmer-to-farmer training videos, including this one, was made possible with the generous support of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) of the McKnight Foundation. Thanks to the Foundation for the Promotion and Research of Andean Products (PROINPA) who introduced us to the communities, and to Eliseo Mamani in particular who led the soil exercises with the farmers for this video.

Related videos

Seeing the life in the soil

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Related Agro-Insight blogs

Soil science, different but right

Killing the soil with chemicals (and bringing it back to life)

Commercialising organic inputs

 

Het leven in de bodem zien

Jeff en ik hebben al eerder verschillende blogs geschreven over het belang van organische stof in de bodem en bodemleven om duurzame voedselproductie te ondersteunen. Bodems met veel levende organismen houden meer koolstof en voedingsstoffen vast en kunnen regenwater beter absorberen en vasthouden, wat allemaal cruciaal is in deze tijden van een verstoord klimaat.

Maar het meten van het leven in de bodem kan een tijdrovende bezigheid zijn, afhankelijk van wat men wil meten. Terwijl bacteri√ęn en schimmels niet met het blote oog te zien zijn, zijn mieren, larven en regenwormen dat wel.

In een van de trainingsvideo’s die we afgelopen februari in Bolivia hebben gefilmd, laat Eliseo Mamani van PROINPA, een wetenschappelijk en technologisch instituut, nauwkeurig zien hoe je samen met boeren de zichtbare bodemorganismen kunt meten. Het gebruik van een gestandaardiseerde methode om het bodemleven te meten is belangrijk als je wilt evalueren welk effect bepaalde landbouwpraktijken hebben op het bodemleven.

Op een vroege ochtend halen we Ana Mamani en Rubén Chipana op van hun huis om ons naar een veld op de altiplano te brengen dat al verschillende jaren wordt bewerkt en waar geen organische meststoffen zijn gebruikt. De boeren van Chiarumani, Patacamaya, ongeveer 100 kilometer ten zuiden van La Paz, hebben door gezamenlijk onderzoek geleerd dat er in sommige delen van het veld meer levende wezens zijn en in andere delen minder, dus nemen ze monsters van 3 delen van het veld.

Met een spade halen ze een blok grond weg van 20 centimeter breed, 20 centimeter lang en 20 centimeter diep. Ze doen al deze grond voorzichtig in een witte zak en sluiten deze goed af, zodat de levende wezens niet kunnen ontsnappen, want de regenwormen en andere levende wezens verplaatsen zich snel.

Daarna rijden we naar een andere plek, waar ze nog 3 monsters verzamelen van een veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen en waar organische groenten worden verbouwd. Alle monsters worden in blauwe zakken gedaan, allemaal netjes gelabeld.

Onder de schaduw van een boom hebben zich nog meer boeren verzameld om te beginnen met het tellen van de levende organismen. Een handvol grond per keer legen ze elke zak op een plastic dienblad. Als ze een levend wezen tegenkomen, pikken ze het er voorzichtig uit en rapporteren het aan Eliseo die aantekeningen maakt: hoeveel regenwormen, hoeveel mieren, hoeveel termieten, hoeveel kevers, hoeveel spinnen en hoeveel engerlingen.

Na een uur worden de resultaten opgeteld en de monsters vergeleken: er zitten alleen veel regenwormen in de grond van het veld dat organische mest heeft gekregen. De boeren bespreken de bevindingen in groep en concluderen: Als je bodem weinig levende wezens heeft, kun je je bodem tot leven brengen door dierlijke mest of compost toe te voegen, door gewasresten op het veld te laten liggen en ze niet te verbranden. Je kunt het bodemleven ook verbeteren door minder te ploegen, want ploegen verstoort bacteri√ęn, schimmels en dieren die vruchtbaarheid aan de bodem toevoegen.

Na terugkomst van onze reis naar Bolivia ben ik nog steeds aan het nadenken over de vele dingen die we hebben geleerd van boeren en de organisaties die samen met hen eenvoudig, maar relevant onderzoek doen, als Marcella naar de velden voor ons kantoor wijst. In maart, aan het begin van de lente, zijn de mollen het actiefst. Het is opvallend: het veld links, dat al een paar jaar niet geploegd of bemest is, heeft veel molshopen. Het veld rechts wordt intensief beheerd en heeft geen enkele molshoop. Door ploegen vermindert het organisch materiaal, dat voedsel is voor regenwormen. Herbiciden en pesticiden doden het bodemleven, waaronder regenwormen. Ook vloeibare mest, die in heel Vlaanderen en Nederland overvloedig wordt gebruikt, kan regenwormen doden, vooral wanneer koeien antibiotica en andere medicijnen hebben gekregen. Vloeibare mest kan ook zware metalen bevatten die worden gebruikt voor diervoeder, zoals zink en koper.

Regenwormen kunnen worden geteld en gebruikt als bio-indicatoren voor de gezondheid van de bodem. Wanneer dit in samenwerking met boerengroepen wordt gedaan, helpt dit boeren te begrijpen hoe bepaalde landbouwpraktijken de gezondheid van hun bodem en de duurzaamheid van hun boerderij op de lange termijn be√Įnvloeden. Maar indien je geen tijd hebt om bodemmonsters te nemen met een spade, bieden bovengrondse indicatoren zoals molshopen een snel alternatief.

Bekijk de video

Seeing the life in the soil

European deserts, coming soon June 11th, 2023 by

Nederlandse versie hieronder

Not a single day passes without news of the increasing challenges farmers face in Europe and in much of the world. Rainfall has become more erratic and intense, and heatwaves are becoming the new normal. We should all be concerned about the speed at which climate change is affecting our planet. How we decide to live, what to eat, where to source our food, and how we spend our leisure time cut across all of society: agriculture, industry, tourism, transport, as well as urban planning and rural land use.

According to the main Spanish farmers‚Äô association, the Coordinator of Farmers‚Äô and Livestock Owners‚Äô Organizations (COAG), drought affects 60% of Spain’s countryside and has destroyed crops across 3.5 million hectares. This is more than double the farm land we have in Belgium and six times that of Flanders.

Three years of very low rainfall and high temperatures have put Spain officially into long-term drought. This year, losses are not limited to wheat, barley and maize, but also expected for nuts, orchards, vineyards, olives, sunflower and vegetable farming. As vegetation is scarce, bees are failing to make honey. Beekeepers are facing a third consecutive season without a harvest. According to a recent CNN article Disappearing lakes, dead crops and trucked-in water, these conditions point to a new reality for parts of Europe, which is warming twice as fast as the global average.

Farms are not the only places in trouble. Municipal water systems are dryer across much of southern Europe. In Italy, in April this year extreme drought was already affecting Lombardy and Piedmont, with 19 towns experiencing the highest level of shortage. Some places have already started receiving water in tanker trucks.

As it takes 15,000 litres of water to produce 1 kilogram of beef and 3,000 litres of water to produce 1 kilogram of cheese, it is no wonder that livestock farming is also at risk. After all, farmers need pasture to feed their animals. When a choice has to be made between ensuring drinking water for its citizens or irrigating pasture and crops to feed animals, governments usually favour cities over farms, but countries need both.

Often governments come up with short-term solutions, such as asking people to stop watering their lawns or washing their cars, instead of planning for long-term measures to conserve water. Different food and fodder crops (and combinations) need to be promoted; more trees and living hedges need to be planted in and around fields to reduce evaporation by the hot sun and dry winds. Above all, measures are needed to store more carbon in the soil.

Enabling citizens to have online access to real-time monitoring of the depth of the groundwater, a natural resource that is invisible, could help to sensitise all of us about the need to conserve water.¬† Groundwater drops quickly due to continuous pumping yet rises only slowly as it is recharged by rainwater from the surface. While monitoring is needed, let us not be na√Įve and think that when the groundwater table is recharged, households, industry and farming can go back to using water in an unlimited way. Already in rural Belgium, even though we had the wettest spring since records began to be kept in 1833, in the countryside we see many old oak trees suffering from the three previous years of water and heat stress.

In many European countries, agricultural lobby groups aggressively sustain their opinion that the livestock sector should not shrink in order to survive. With all that is happening, how long will they be able to continue taking such an unrealistic position? Animals can be properly fed with technologies that use water and fossil fuels more efficiently , but technological solutions also have their limitations. If lobby groups do not help their members to adapt, the climate will soon dictate what is possible and what is not. The changes we see in southern Europe should set off alarms in the north as well.

If we are unable to quickly and drastically curb greenhouse gas emissions and invest in an agriculture that helps to cool the planet, rather than deplete its natural resources, we will soon no longer need to fly to the Sahara to see a desert. Climate refugees will come from Southern Europe, and we will scratch our heads and wonder why many of our favourite food products are no longer available or affordable.

Sources

Bertelli, Michele. 2023. ‘No water, no life’: Drought threatens farmers and food in Italy. https://www.context.news/climate-risks/no-water-no-life-drought-threatens-farmers-and-food-in-italy

CNN. 2023. Disappearing lakes, dead crops and trucked-in water: Drought-stricken Spain is running dry. https://edition.cnn.com/2023/05/02/europe/spain-drought-catalonia-heat-wave-climate-intl/index.html

Related Agro-Insight blogs

The times they are a changing

Capturing carbon in our soils

Gabe Brown, agroecology on a commercial scale

HuŐągelkultur

Rotational grazing

Soil for a living planet

A revolution for our soil

Recovering from the quinoa boom

From soil fertility to cheese

Creativity of the commons

Killing the soil with chemicals (and bringing it back to life)

The nitrogen crisis

Farmer learning videos on adaptation to climate change

Improved pasture for fertile soil

Rotational grazing

Living windbreaks to protect the soil

Mulch for a better soil and crop

Hydroponic fodder

Intercropping maize with pigeon peas

Growing azolla for feed

Water users’ associations

Drip irrigation for tomato

Pitcher irrigation

 

Europese woestijnen, binnenkort

Er gaat geen dag voorbij zonder nieuws over de toenemende uitdagingen waar boeren in Europa en een groot deel van de wereld voor staan. Regenval is grilliger en intenser geworden en hittegolven worden het nieuwe normaal. We zouden ons allemaal zorgen moeten maken over de snelheid waarmee klimaatverandering onze planeet be√Įnvloedt. De manier waarop we besluiten te leven, wat we eten, waar we ons voedsel vandaan halen en hoe we onze vrije tijd doorbrengen, heeft invloed op de hele maatschappij: landbouw, industrie, toerisme, transport, maar ook stadsplanning en landgebruik op het platteland.

Volgens de belangrijkste Spaanse boerenorganisatie COAG treft de droogte 60% van het Spaanse platteland en heeft het gewassen vernietigd op 3,5 miljoen hectare. Dat is meer dan het dubbele van de landbouwgrond in Belgi√ę en zes keer zoveel als in Vlaanderen.

Drie jaar van zeer weinig neerslag en hoge temperaturen hebben Spanje officieel in langdurige droogte gebracht. Dit jaar blijven de verliezen niet beperkt tot tarwe, gerst en ma√Įs, maar worden ook verliezen verwacht voor noten, boomgaarden, wijngaarden, olijven, zonnebloemen en de groenteteelt. Omdat de vegetatie schaars is, lukt het bijen niet om honing te maken. Imkers worden geconfronteerd met een derde opeenvolgend seizoen zonder oogst. Volgens een recent CNN-artikel Verdwijnende meren, dode gewassen en aangevoerd water wijzen deze omstandigheden op een nieuwe realiteit voor delen van Europa, dat twee keer zo snel opwarmt als het wereldwijde gemiddelde.

Niet alleen boerderijen hebben problemen. Gemeentelijke watersystemen drogen in een groot deel van Zuid-Europa uit. In Itali√ę werden Lombardije en Piemonte in april van dit jaar al getroffen door extreme droogte, waarbij 19 steden te kampen hadden met het grootste tekort. Sommige plaatsen zijn al begonnen met het aanvoeren van water in tankwagens.

Aangezien er 15.000 liter water nodig is om 1 kilo rundvlees te produceren en 3.000 liter water om 1 kilo kaas te produceren, is het geen wonder dat ook de veehouderij gevaar loopt. Boeren hebben immers weiland nodig om hun dieren te voeden. Als er een keuze moet worden gemaakt tussen het veiligstellen van drinkwater voor de burgers of het irrigeren van weilanden en gewassen om dieren te voeden, geven regeringen meestal de voorkeur aan steden boven boerderijen, maar landen hebben beide nodig.

Vaak komen regeringen met kortetermijnoplossingen, zoals mensen vragen om te stoppen met het besproeien van hun gazons of het wassen van hun auto’s, in plaats van langetermijn maatregelen te plannen om water te besparen. Verschillende voedsel- en voedergewassen (en combinaties daarvan) moeten worden gepromoot; er moeten meer bomen en levende heggen worden geplant in en rond akkers om de verdamping door de hete zon en droge wind te verminderen. Bovenal zijn er maatregelen nodig om meer koolstof in de bodem op te slaan.

Door burgers online toegang te geven tot realtime monitoring van de diepte van het grondwater, een natuurlijke hulpbron die onzichtbaar is, kunnen we ons allemaal bewust worden van de noodzaak om water te besparen.¬† Grondwater daalt snel als gevolg van voortdurend pompen, maar stijgt slechts langzaam als het wordt aangevuld door regenwater van het oppervlak. Hoewel monitoring nodig is, moeten we niet na√Įef zijn en denken dat wanneer het grondwaterpeil weer wordt aangevuld, huishoudens, industrie en landbouw weer onbeperkt water kunnen gebruiken. Hoewel we in Belgi√ę de natste lente sinds het begin van de metingen in 1833 hebben gehad, zien we op het platteland al veel oude eikenbomen die lijden onder de drie voorgaande jaren van water- en hittestress.

In veel Europese landen houden landbouwlobbygroepen agressief vol dat de veehouderij niet mag inkrimpen om te overleven. Hoe lang kunnen ze zo’n onrealistisch standpunt blijven innemen, nu er zoveel gebeurt? Dieren kunnen goed gevoed worden met technologie√ęn die effici√ęnter gebruik maken van water en fossiele brandstoffen, maar technologische oplossingen hebben ook hun beperkingen. Als lobbygroepen hun leden niet helpen om zich aan te passen, zal het klimaat snel dicteren wat mogelijk is en wat niet. De veranderingen die we in Zuid-Europa zien, zouden ook in het noorden alarmbellen moeten doen rinkelen.

Als we er niet in slagen om de uitstoot van broeikasgassen snel en drastisch te beperken en te investeren in een landbouw die de planeet helpt afkoelen in plaats van haar natuurlijke hulpbronnen uit te putten, dan hoeven we binnenkort niet meer naar de Sahara te vliegen om een woestijn te zien. Klimaatvluchtelingen zullen uit Zuid-Europa komen en wij zullen ons op het hoofd krabben en ons afvragen waarom veel van onze favoriete voedingsproducten niet meer verkrijgbaar of betaalbaar zijn.

Design by Olean webdesign